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Micropipette Set Buy


Micropipettes are essential tools in any lab setting. The MiniOne Micropipette Set includes 3 lab-quality MiniOne variable volume micropipettes, ideal for use with MiniOne Electrophoresis and PCR systems as well in as other classroom and lab applications.




micropipette set buy



This set of efficient, ubiquitous micropipettes come protected in a case constructed of durable, easy-to-clean, waterproof-coated lycra. With its carrying strap, rugged velcro closure, and mesh pocket to hold pipette tips or other small items, the case ensures your pipette set stays safe, organized, and clean, use after use.


Microlit Pipette Set combines the most frequently used single channel pipettes (0.5-10ul pipette, 10-100ul pipette, 100-1000ul pipette) into a compact package. Each of the three Microlit RBO Single Channel Variable Volume Micropipette are high precision adjustable micropipettes designed with ergonomics in mind. They facilitates remarkable user experience and impeccable accuracy in practical laboratory environments. The use of adjustable micropipettes is highly recommended for Molecular biology, Microbiology, Immunology, cell culture, Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Genetics etc.


Microlit Micropipette Starter Kit combines 4 single channel pipettes to cover the complete pipetting range (0.5-10ul pipette, 10-100ul pipette, 100-1000ul pipette, 1-10ml pipette). The micropipette kit also includes a beautiful carousel stand and boxes of compatible tips for each pipette so that you do not have to go looking for the right tips.


Each of the four Microlit RBO Single Channel Variable Volume Micropipettes are high precision adjustable micropipettes designed with ergonomics in mind. They facilitate remarkable user experience and impeccable accuracy in practical laboratory environments. The use of adjustable volume pipettes is highly recommended for Molecular biology, Microbiology, Immunology, cell culture, Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Genetics etc.


Use these micropipettes to complete the pipetting learning exercise with the Pipette-it Kit, and complete your at-home, class, or community lab set-up, to be well on your way to becoming a pipetting pro!


Each of the four Microlit RBO Single Channel Variable Volume Micropipettes are high precision micropipettes designed with ergonomics in mind. They facilitate remarkable user experience and impeccable accuracy in practical laboratory environments. The pipettes are highly recommended for molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, cell culture, analytical chemistry, biochemistry, genetics etc.


A micropipette is a common yet essential laboratory instrument used toaccurately and precisely transfer volumes of liquid in the microliterrange. Micropipettes are available in single-channel and multi-channel variants.


Regardless of the type of pipette, you might have seen in a lab, onecomponent ubiquitous to all pipettes is the micropipette tip, which is a simple, plastic molded and disposable head of the equipment. In other words, a pipette is of no use without its pipette tip!


The Eppendorf Research plus is one of the safest and most ergonomic mechanical pipettes available. Meeting the highest needs of precision and accuracy while providing high flexibility via a large number of variants, the Research plus will become an indispensable companion in your lab. This micropipette is remarkably light, both in terms of weight and pipetting forces, which helps you to avoid hand and arm strain. The 16- and 24-channel pipette system combines proven concepts with new innovations and facilitates quick & easy manual pipetting in 384-well plates. More information


The ultra-light pipette for effortless pipettingThe Eppendorf Research plus mechanical pipette is the result of over 60 years of experience in liquid handling and is one of the most commonly used pipettes in the world. Thanks to the pioneering Eppendorf PhysioCare Concept, the Research plus is highly ergonomic and protects your health in the laboratory. It features very low weight and operation forces, is extremely reliable, fully autoclavable and easy to use.With a variety of options available, including single-channel pipettes with fixed or variable volume, multi-channel pipette options with 8, 12, 16 or 24 channels, and our Research plus Move It adjustable tip spacing micropipettes, we are confident that we can offer the right choice for your application.


The spring-loaded tip cone saves you time and energy. With haptic feedback, all it takes is one gentle push-down for easy tip attachment. The spring limits the attachment forces and at the same time guarantees a reproducible and safe tip fit. This clever design provides increased user-to-user reproducibility and more consistent results between different lab members. All non-adjustable micropipettes from Eppendorf up to 1,000 µL are equipped with the spring-loaded tip cone feature.


I therefore want to tell the story of the invention of the piston-driven, plastic-tip micropipette. This singular feat was accomplished in the late 1950s by Heinrich Schnitger, a German scientist and inventor (Fig 1). Schnitger drowned in 1964 and his mentor Theodor Bücher passed away in 1997, so it is no longer possible to obtain a personal account of his invention. I was a close witness to Schnitger's work on the micropipette and other inventions, which took place at the Institute of Physiological Chemistry at the University of Marburg, Germany. In addition to my personal recollections, I rely on Birgit Pfeiffer's excellent research on the development of the 'Marburg pipette' (Pfeiffer, 2004).


Not surprisingly, there were many drawbacks to the Carlsberg pipette. The use of filters to protect against ingesting toxic or infectious fluids was not a fail-safe precaution. Small particles often plugged the restriction and rendered the pipette unusable. Some enzymologists cleaned their micropipettes using poisonous chromic sulphuric acid to remove contamination. They broke easily, particularly the delicate tips, which were often chipped away. In addition to constriction pipettes, other devices were commonly used, such as single-use glass capillaries that filled spontaneously when dipped into a liquid. In the late 1950s, the first commercial micropipettes using metal pistons became available. However, because the liquid came into contact with the metal pistons, there was always the risk of corrosion and contamination. The pistons could also become jammed in the glass capillary, making cleaning cumbersome.


Heinrich Schnitger joined Bücher's group in 1957 as a postdoc and experienced the same pitfalls in handling microlitre volumes. His annoyance with the cumbersome Carlsberg pipette eventually led him to invent the modern micropipette and thus radically change the way in which biologists handle small volumes of liquids. His invention was not a sudden enlightenment; the vexing problem of micropipetting met an ingenious mind who challenged problems from an unconventional angle.


It was obvious from the outset that while doing his routine work of aliquoting chromatography fractions for further analysis, Schnitger viewed micropipetting by mouth with great contempt. He eventually disappeared from the laboratory for a couple of days and came back with a self-designed tool to pipette microlitre volumes. His device already had all the essential features of what would later become the modern micropipette. Initially, Schnitger 'rebuilt' a tuberculin syringe by adding a spring to the piston that met an upward stop to define the pipetting volume. The syringe needle was replaced by a PE tip, pulled from PE tubing. An air buffer separated the fluid from the syringe piston and confined it to the plastic tip. The device was originally intended for pipetting chromatography fractions that contained corrosive formic acid so that they did not touch the metal piston, but the clever features of Schnitger's device dramatically sped up and eased many other experiments, as it enabled more accurate pipetting of all aqueous solutions. Bücher soon realized the enormous potential of this invention and encouraged Schnitger to develop the pipette further while relieving him of his research work. Schnitger added various mechanical measures required for the exact and repetitive pipetting of small volumes. A major breakthrough was the introduction of a second coaxial spring, which allowed the piston to be pushed beyond the delivery point to blow out any residual fluid from the plastic tip.


Although the piston-driven pipette would eventually be used for larger volumes, Schnitger's real interest was in the exact and convenient pipetting of very small volumes in the microlitre range. He soon realized that the material and shape of the plastic tip were important for exact handling of liquids. Schnitger was fascinated by the properties of Teflon, which he thought to be an excellent material for pipette tips because it completely repels water if the surface is smooth and clean. To obtain smooth surfaces, he made diamond-honed tools with polished cutting edges to carve micro-tips from solid Teflon. The idea was to deliver microlitre drops of liquid in such a way that the tip was left clean for using with other solutions. Since Teflon cannot be melted for injection molding, Schnitger experimented with baking Teflon powder into the shape of a micropipette tip. In tireless work he determined the optimum conditions for sintering the powder while developing special equipment to control pressure and temperature precisely. Even the manufacturer of Teflon, Dupont Inc. (Wilmington, DE, USA), sent its experts to Marburg to study this new sintering procedure. When properly handled, the tips were unsurpassed for accuracy. But they were too expensive for single use and required careful maintenance. Teflon tips were eventually used only during the early stages of the invention in Marburg and for the initial experimental production sets. 041b061a72


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